WHY FEAR IS THE ENEMY OF ENTREPRENEURS 2018-02-08T06:50:36+00:00

ENTREPRENEUR INSIGHTS

GREAT IDEAS FOR ENTREPRENEURS FROM THE THOUGHT LEADERS AT CASEY NEILON

KEY TAKE-AWAY

One of the worst things an entrepreneur can do is move ahead with half-hearted conviction.

What Entrepreneurs Fear

At Casey Neilon we are CPAs, but we are also entrepreneurs.  In fact I would say we are entrepreneurs first and accountants second.  For more than a decade we have seen the ups and downs of entrepreneurship.  We have taken many risks, some of which have turned out well and others not so much.

I believe entrepreneurs must take risks.  There is no reward without risk.  But when I work with clients who are facing a big decision or who are going through adversity, fear can stymie risk-taking.  Fear can make them feel boxed in, as if there is little hope for a way forward.  What sorts of things do entrepreneurs tend to fear?

  • Getting hit with a huge tax bill
  • Going through an exhaustive and disruptive audit
  • Losing wealth
  • Adverse economic headwinds that make growth seem impossible
  • Making the wrong or poor decisions at a critical moment
  • The power of the Federal and State governments
  • Dealing with complexities of all sorts that they do not understand
  • Being wiped out by situations they cannot see coming or control

These fears are real and so are the risks.  The professionals in our firm work with many entrepreneurs who face these fears.  Our managing partner worked with a client who endured the perfect storm a few years ago.  The real estate industry, in which his businesses were situated, tanked and nearly wiped him out.  An advisor gave him poor counsel.  Audits kicked in because of the poor advice.  A loved one passed away.  His business was on the edge of going under.  It seemed like everything was going wrong for him and his family.

But he didn’t panic.  It’s taken time and a lot of effort on his part, but he is back.  The audits are over.  Business has rebounded.  He gets better advice now.  The storm has passed.  He is not unscathed, that’s for sure.  But he loves what he does every day and looks forward to work.  He is a better entrepreneur today and has high hopes for the future.

How To Get Past Fear And Achieve Your Potential

After working with dozens of entrepreneurs who are facing adversity, and after watching my colleagues at Casey Neilon advise clients in similar situations, I’ve learned a few lessons.   If you want to get past fear and become a stronger and more confident entrepreneur, an entrepreneur who boldly takes advantage of real market opportunities, I believe you need 3 things:

  1. You need a trusted partner who can serve as your guide
  2. You need good information and reliable data
  3. You need a vision and a plan that you really believe in and are willing to risk everything to achieve

Let’s explore these a bit.

You Need A Trusted Partner

In the accounting industry, we are often thought of as technicians – as if the machinery of taxation is already set on the factory floor and we simply turn the knobs.  I believe that is a woefully inadequate picture of what we do.  At Casey Neilon, we are not simply tax technicians.  We are also business advisors.  The implications of our advice are far reaching, potentially life-altering.

For instance, a few years ago a client came to us with a big decision.  They had some available cash and felt that they could expand their business operations and achieve potentially exponential growth if they built a new facility and added new equipment.  But it was a big expense and a huge risk.

There were so many things to consider:

  • Were they investing in a growth industry with long-term potential?
  • Was it a better use of cash to buy land and build on it or was it better to rent a building and invest cash in more machinery? Which approach produced more profit, more scalable growth, more fixed costs that could be hard to unload if the market tanked?
  • Was it better to buy with cash, finance or some combination of both? For instance, was it better to buy the land and finance the equipment?
  • What were the tax implications of the various options?
  • How much cash did they need to keep in reserve for unplanned expenses?
  • How did the venture impact the valuation of the business? How did it impact credit standing with suppliers whose confidence was critical?
  • How did the venture impact the net worth of the business owners?

Behind it all, however, was the fierce belief in this entrepreneurial family that they could bet on themselves and win.  They could have taken that cash and invested it in a traditional portfolio of securities with a 30-year horizon.  But that was not even a consideration for them.

They wanted to take the risk.  They could envision that new building with its manufacturing facilities and the efficiencies and growth it would produce.  That vision excited them.  It seemed to be all they could think about.

We modeled out the various scenarios and the tax implications of each.  We looked at cash-flows and made projections on future sales based on a history of invoices and clients.  This helped them understand better their cash-on-hand requirements for operating expenses and reserves for the unexpected.

It was a tough decision with no perfectly clear answer about the best way to proceed.  Ultimately, the client chose to move ahead and we got to witness their dreams taking flight.  They chose a path, rolled the dice and dove in without looking back.  I love that about entrepreneurs.

But along the way, we helped them think through a lot of different things.  We spent a lot of time listening to them and understanding where they were coming from.  They told us stories about their family and childhoods and how these experiences shaped their values and their willingness to take risk.  They trusted us.

If you want to get past fear and achieve your potential as an entrepreneur, you need a trusted partner who gets you and can help you in those critical times when the outcomes really matter.

You Need Good Information And Reliable Data

It is an unfortunate reality for many entrepreneurs.  The information and data they rely on to make decisions is not accurate or up to date.  This takes several forms.

Numerous clients have retained us to provide oversight for internal bookkeepers and to find material inaccuracies and fix them.  If your financials are wrong, any models of future projections you build based on those financials will also be wrong.  This is like building sand castles on a beach all day in the hot sun only to have the tides wash them away in the evening.

It’s not just financial data that that can be troublesome.  The greater the complexity of your business and personal financial situation, the more options you have to mitigate taxes.  Some of these options can become quite complex.  Tax codes, regulations and laws change fairly frequently.  This is a major reason you need to be working with an entrepreneurially-oriented advisor who is experienced at navigating these complexities.

If you want to get past fear and achieve your potential as an entrepreneur, you need good information and reliable data.

You Need A Vision You Can Believe In

Fear limits vision.  But the right visioning process can put fear on the run.  Entrepreneurs are born dreamers.  But not all dreams are realistic or based on hard data.  This is where data-driven planning can be very helpful.

Business owners are faced with a barrage of decisions almost daily.  From staffing choices to inventory management to cash-flow planning to whether or not to take on that next big contract you’re not quite sure about.  Too many entrepreneurs make decisions by the seat of their pants, sometimes not even recognizing that they are making important decisions that could have long-term consequences.

While taking risk is necessary, not all risks are worth taking.  On more than one occasion, we’ve had clients inform us about decisions they’ve already made that they regret.  Had they come to us proactively and told me what they were thinking about, we could very likely have helped them arrive at a better decision.

If you want to move ahead with the utmost confidence, I believe you need both a vision and a plan.  The plan needs to be informed by and based on accurate and realistic data.  The plan should include multiple scenarios and your anticipated responses to those outcomes – before they ever happen.  Why should you do this?

Here is what I’ve noticed.  One of the worst things an entrepreneur can do is move ahead with half-hearted conviction.  Running any business is hard and requires sacrifice: long hours, financial risks, not to mention the impact on family life and the often-justified complaints that your body might be home, but your mind is still at work.  Heard that one?

If you’re going to endure all of that, do you really want to add self-doubt to the list?  Constantly second-guessing yourself because you didn’t do enough planning is like adding insult to injury.  Trust me – you don’t want to be there.

If you want to get past fear and achieve your potential as an entrepreneur, you need a vision and a plan that you really believe in and are willing to risk everything to achieve.

Why I Do What I Do

I love what I do.  I thoroughly enjoy working with entrepreneurs to help breathe life into their dreams.  But one of the most important things I do is to help my clients manage fear.  I give them clarity where uncertainty reigned.  That makes me very proud.

If you believe the horizon is dark, the goal is to circle the wagons and ride out the storm.  This mind-set causes you to miss opportunities – the very opportunities you need.  But if you have the right partner and the right plan based on hard data, you can move ahead with confidence about your future.

If there is anything I can do to help you achieve clarity and confidence, let’s talk.

POSTED BY

Nicola Neilon – CPA, SHAREHOLDER
I am a CPA and shareholder at Casey Neilon. In this role, I work with many small businesses and their owners. I love that this gives me the opportunity to go beyond just being a tax preparer or auditor. The long-term relationship that develops encompasses the roles of business advisor and trusted confidant. I have been serving clients in this capacity since 1997. My experiences have taught me that I am not Wonder Woman, nor do I have a crystal ball, but many people have no background in accounting and finance, and they need someone that they can trust to help them navigate a path to reach their goals.